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  1. #1
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    Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    Doing research for the civilian conference in the spring. Saw where a secession woman was wearing a bonnet "a la gabrielle" in the colors of black and white with yellow ribbon ties. Am thinking about having one made up. Went on the internet and see gabrielle was a designer in europe in the 1860's, but a picture i cannot find as a template for recreation.

    Tom arliskas
    csuniforms

  2. #2
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    There may not be a single defining "a la gabrielle" style... fashion names are notoriously shifty, as writers try to spark new interest in slightly-adapted shapes and styles.

    Was there a time of year attached to the reference?
    Regards,
    Elizabeth Clark
    Citizen Moderator

  3. #3
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    Quote Originally Posted by ElizabethClark View Post
    There may not be a single defining "a la gabrielle" style... fashion names are notoriously shifty, as writers try to spark new interest in slightly-adapted shapes and styles.

    Was there a time of year attached to the reference?
    Here is the specific reference

    November 24, 1860 Richmond Daily Dispatch:
    New Fashion for Ladies.
    We observed, while on a visit to a lady friend, a bonnet and dress of Georgia Lindsey and cotton, designed for the daughter of one of our leading secessionists. The dress is made in fashionable style, a la Gabrielle, and the bonnet is composed of white and black Georgia cotton, covered with a net-work of black cotton, the streamers ornamented with Palmetto trees and lone stars, embroidered in gold thread, while the feathers are formed of white and black worsted. The entire work is domestic, as well as the material, and exhibits considerable ingenuity. The idea illustrates the patriotism of the ladies, and their earnest sympathy with the great Southern movement, while its execution affords convincing proof of how independent we can be of our Northern aggressors, when we have the will to undertake and the energy to achieve.

    Thank You Elizabeth++++

    Tom Arliskas
    CSuniforms

  4. #4
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    Quote Originally Posted by csuniforms View Post
    Here is the specific reference

    November 24, 1860 Richmond Daily Dispatch:
    New Fashion for Ladies.
    We observed, while on a visit to a lady friend, a bonnet and dress of Georgia Lindsey and cotton, designed for the daughter of one of our leading secessionists. The dress is made in fashionable style, a la Gabrielle, and the bonnet is composed of white and black Georgia cotton, covered with a net-work of black cotton, the streamers ornamented with Palmetto trees and lone stars, embroidered in gold thread, while the feathers are formed of white and black worsted. The entire work is domestic, as well as the material, and exhibits considerable ingenuity. The idea illustrates the patriotism of the ladies, and their earnest sympathy with the great Southern movement, while its execution affords convincing proof of how independent we can be of our Northern aggressors, when we have the will to undertake and the energy to achieve.

    Thank You Elizabeth++++

    Tom Arliskas
    CSuniforms
    I answered my own question-- the dress is Gabrielle-- something to do with ruffles or collars-- the bonnet would be an 1860 style-- I wish someone kept one somewhere so we could look at it 150 years later.

    Tom Arliskas
    CSuniforms

  5. #5
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    These black and white secession bonnets show up in newspaper reports and snippets passed from book to book, so one can pick up other little details as the story travels. How many bonnets there actually were, or how many were retellings of the same story, it's hard to say. There seems to be a recurring theme of the bonnets showing up at the time of the SC secession convention, and also a Georgia connection.

    I'm curious why the choice of black and white. It seems like red-white-red wasn't considered the default secession color scheme yet, but what was the significance of black and white? Was it connected to the fact that black and white happened to be fashionable colors for bonnets at that time anyway, or was black and white specifically a sign of secession? Cotton isn't easy to dye black with home-grown dyes, so it seems an odd choice if it was meant to be a symbol of self-sufficiency.

    MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [MEMPHIS, TN], December 8, 1860, p. 2, c. 3
    Secession Bonnet.--The Charleston Mercury gives the following description of a bonnet worn by a South Carolina lady:
    "The bonnet is composed of white and black cotton, and streamers ornamented with gold thread, while the feathers are formed of white and black worsted."
    What would our Lincoln ladies think of a distinctive bonnet of Connecticut corn cobs, trimmed with pumpkin vines, and ornamented with wooden nutmegs?--Hartford paper. Source.
    [Upon the announcement that South Carolina had seceded] the side-walks were crowded with ladies wearing secession bonnets made of black and white Georgia cotton, decorated with ornaments of Palmetto-trees and lone stars. Source
    The streets of Charleston were filled with excited people huzzaing for a Southern Confederacy, and several women made a public display of their so-called patriotism, by appearing on the crowded side-walks with "secession bonnets," the invention of a Northern milliner in Charleston. Source.
    THE CONSTITUTIONAL [ALEXANDRIA, LA], December 29, 1860, p. 3, c. 1
    A Secession "White House" and a Secession Bonnet.—A correspondent writing from Macon, Ga.—where the cotton planters' fair is being held—to the Charleston Mercury, furnishes the annexed paragraphs:...
    Miss L. L. Winemann, of Charleston, S. C., contributes a "secession bonnet," dedicated to the daughters of Georgia by a Carolina sister. The materials of the same art of Georgia wool, very tastefully combined; a ruche of black cloth, rolled and tipped with gilt, strings of black home-made woolen, edged with gold braid and a palmetto embroidered in gold on the tips of the strings. Source.
    At an annual State exhibition in Georgia, a lady presented a "Secession bonnet," of home manufacture, with a resolution (adopted) to be independent of the North in the future. Source
    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

  6. #6
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    [QUOTE=Hank Trent;191522]These black and white secession bonnets show up in newspaper reports and snippets passed from book to book, so one can pick up other little details as the story travels. How many bonnets there actually were, or how many were retellings of the same story, it's hard to say. There seems to be a recurring theme of the bonnets showing up at the time of the SC secession convention, and also a Georgia connection.

    I'm curious why the choice of black and white. It seems like red-white-red wasn't considered the default secession color scheme yet, but what was the significance of black and white? Was it connected to the fact that black and white happened to be fashionable colors for bonnets at that time anyway, or was black and white specifically a sign of secession? Cotton isn't easy to dye black with home-grown dyes, so it seems an odd choice if it was meant to be a symbol of self-sufficiency.











    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com[/QUOTE

    Hank your right! Red-white-red were the Secession colors. Actually right after SC secession December, 1860-red-white-blue were the colors used in some cockades and bonnets. Makes sense, the same colors as the first Confederate National flag. The wearing of cotton, GEORGIA cotton, in black and white, has to do with the homespun craze in the South where Southerners started to wear only homespun clothing in protest of Northern manufactured goods. You were right again when you said the color of the this bonnet or the same story line, was seen in many old books and articles-- I guess they believed plagarism was not a bad thing in the latter half of the 19th Century. I am having two bonnets made up right now, one Secession and one Pro-Union.

    Tom Arliskas
    CSuniforms

  7. #7
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    Quote Originally Posted by csuniforms View Post
    The wearing of cotton, GEORGIA cotton, in black and white, has to do with the homespun craze in the South where Southerners started to wear only homespun clothing in protest of Northern manufactured goods.
    Yes, I "get" the homespun cotton idea--this was obviously a symbol of self-sufficiency like the homespun dresses--but why black and white? What was the significance of the colors? I can figure out the cotton, the star, the palmetto, even maybe the feathers made of worsted rather than imported marabou (though why not use chicken feathers?).

    But why black and white? Colors were/are usually important in patriotic objects, and the colors seem to be mentioned in each account as if the symbolism was self-evident.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

  8. #8
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    Hello! what an interesing post. thanks!
    the dress may just be simply that of a basic bodice with Gabrielle sleeves(gathered puffs the full length of the sleeve) or perhaps sometimes both bodice and sleeves were gathered and puffed. Then this blouse/bodice could be worn with a swiss bodice of some sort.
    The bonnet...made of Ga cotton, and covered with black net..the streamers were embroidered with ensigna of the Palmento State..and Feathers made of worsted(there are instructions in Godey's and Petersons how to make "feathers" from fabrics)...All a show of how the southerm movement could be independen of the North. Very interesting reading
    You could easily make a gabrielle bodice of cotton organdy...the bonnet might be a bit more challenging but fun to try
    Good Luck
    Vivian Murphy
    http://www.themantuamaker.net

  9. #9
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    Hello Vivian, After taking a poll we all agree you should make a Secession Bonnet... You have a better idea of what was involved than I. I know that the colors do mean something, but black and white and yellow. These Bonnets were said to have been up by a milliner from up North with a millinery shop in Charleston.--- The people say it was indeed something to see. It did make a statement..

    Tom Arliskas
    CSuniforms

  10. #10
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    Re: Question? What does a bonnet 'a la gabrielle' style look like?

    Quote Originally Posted by csuniforms View Post
    I know that the colors do mean something, but black and white and yellow.
    We seem to be talking past each other... How do you know that they mean something? Do you have evidence or a more logical reason than I've presented? If so, I'd be curious about the evidence or the reasoning.

    I'm only assuming they do, because colors usually do in patriotic things and the writers took the time to mention the colors, but I have no evidence. Since black and white was a fashionable combination at the time, it may have just "meant" that a person could make a perfectly fashionable bonnet using only homemade materials. Or it may have meant nothing at all, just as the fact that it had network or ruching didn't "mean" anything (in my opinion), other than those were just common attributes of bonnets.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

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